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mike915
07-30-2010, 09:31 PM
I was reading some topics from the forum, and lots of people say that the
(-NNNN+NNNN-NNNN+NNNN-) configuration is the best but other people say that it's better this (-NNNNN+NNNNN-NNNNN+NNNNN-).
So which one is the best?? 5 neutrals or 4

myoldyourgold
07-31-2010, 04:33 PM
I was reading some topics from the forum, and lots of people say that the
(-NNNN+NNNN-NNNN+NNNN-) configuration is the best but other people say that it's better this (-NNNNN+NNNNN-NNNNN+NNNNN-).
So which one is the best?? 5 neutrals or 4


Mike, as with a lot of questions it is not simple and is debatable. There are a number of things to take into consideration and in some cases not enough test data, from reliable sources, is available. In my opinion it has a lot to do with what you are trying to do. If you are going to put this in your car you need to think of size and where to mount it to help keep it cool and how long are you going to run it. The longer you run the hotter it gets. Heat is going to be a major problem with a 4 stack 21 plate series reactor. With only 4 bipolar plates (neutrals) per stack your voltage per cell is going to be approximately 3.45 volts. This is going to create a lot of heat. Now to complicate maters there are 4 stacks so you will have a circulation problem, which results in higher pressures in the reactor, lower electrolyte levels, higher temperature and less gas and more steam. Not good at all. The center cells will get much hotter than the rest, and that is if you have exit ports and entrance ports on both sides of the reactor. If you have ports only on one side then the cells on the opposite side will over heat and cause the same problem. You can see it just keeps getting more complicated. My advice is to go to 6 bipolar plates 3 stack 22 plate reactor. That is if you want a big reactor. It will then only have around 1.97 volts per cell. This will help solve some of the problems. You might not need such a big reactor. In your 4 stack design in order to run each stack at 10 amps you are going to have put 40 amps in. Now in the 3 stack with only one additional plate, same active surface area, you would only have to put in 30 amps. Less amps and less voltage makes a cooler more efficient cell. You still will have to work on the circulation problem but at least it will be a lot better.

mike915
08-01-2010, 03:24 AM
Mike, as with a lot of questions it is not simple and is debatable. There are a number of things to take into consideration and in some cases not enough test data, from reliable sources, is available. In my opinion it has a lot to do with what you are trying to do. If you are going to put this in your car you need to think of size and where to mount it to help keep it cool and how long are you going to run it. The longer you run the hotter it gets. Heat is going to be a major problem with a 4 stack 21 plate series reactor. With only 4 bipolar plates (neutrals) per stack your voltage per cell is going to be approximately 3.45 volts. This is going to create a lot of heat. Now to complicate maters there are 4 stacks so you will have a circulation problem, which results in higher pressures in the reactor, lower electrolyte levels, higher temperature and less gas and more steam. Not good at all. The center cells will get much hotter than the rest, and that is if you have exit ports and entrance ports on both sides of the reactor. If you have ports only on one side then the cells on the opposite side will over heat and cause the same problem. You can see it just keeps getting more complicated. My advice is to go to 6 bipolar plates 3 stack 22 plate reactor. That is if you want a big reactor. It will then only have around 1.97 volts per cell. This will help solve some of the problems. You might not need such a big reactor. In your 4 stack design in order to run each stack at 10 amps you are going to have put 40 amps in. Now in the 3 stack with only one additional plate, same active surface area, you would only have to put in 30 amps. Less amps and less voltage makes a cooler more efficient cell. You still will have to work on the circulation problem but at least it will be a lot better.

But I thought that the amps were the ones getting the cell hotter and not the volts could you explain me???

Thanks

myoldyourgold
08-01-2010, 11:52 PM
Read this http://www.hhoforums.com/showthread.php?t=1625&highlight=heat

jwhhopower1978
10-22-2010, 05:24 AM
I was reading some topics from the forum, and lots of people say that the
(-NNNN+NNNN-NNNN+NNNN-) configuration is the best but other people say that it's better this (-NNNNN+NNNNN-NNNNN+NNNNN-).
So which one is the best?? 5 neutrals or 4

Hi .

For higher quality hhogas go for 5 or 6 N .. and try to separate cells if ypu build series drycells (-NNNNNN+Distance-NNNNNN+Distance-NNNNNN+) keeps your MMW higher

Stevo
10-22-2010, 01:35 PM
IMO:

Go with 5 neutral plates and oversized reactive surface area along with greater gaps between all plates. The oversizing will draw more amps by itself, but larger gapping will help to cancel some of that out. Use a ccpwm to keep the amps down and voltage somewhere near 2v per plate.

Your cell will run cooler, produce less steam and depending on your output needs you may be able to use less elyte.

And remember:
"A hole in your plate will negate."

HHOJeeper
10-24-2010, 11:26 PM
I know electricity follows the path of least resistance. The negative plates produce the H2, right? So what if I built something horizontal >top -nnnnn+nnnnn-then larger ground plate at bottom. Basically to catch and use any lost power in the elyte and create a larger negative surface area on one end. I know mostly everyone uses vertically spaced plates but I prefer horizontal plates. Water falls in the top and bubbles out the top.

lhazleton
10-25-2010, 03:26 PM
Several of us have already done this. It really doesn't help at all. Running horizontally can inhibit E-lyte flow if a pump isn't used. Additionally, it takes longer for the bubbles to clear the reactive surfaces, diminishing active surface area.