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sm0kin
08-20-2008, 05:03 AM
ok so i built a cell and have been running it at 8volts 4.5 amps using tap water and baking soda. i know the discoloration is possibly due to the electrolyte. the thing is the center of the plates are black and all around the edges there is no discoloration. if i ever figure out how to post a pic i will. thoughts on this, the plates are thin and possibly maybe they are closer in the middle? or the edges?

sm0kin
08-20-2008, 05:14 AM
http://img139.imageshack.us/img139/2128/pic0198mx9.th.jpg (http://img139.imageshack.us/my.php?image=pic0198mx9.jpg)

bigapple
08-20-2008, 07:10 AM
regardless of where the discoloration is, i can tell u right now that u have tons of impurities in ur solution for ur generator

1. using tap water is a bad idea... its good for testing to not waste ur good distilled water, but for normal operation, using tap water will cause ur plates to wear away much much quicker... the impurities in the water will leech out ur good metals and cause the iron in ur plates to bond with oxygen and form tons of rust (brown scum)... using tap will cause u to have to clean out ur generator all the time since it collects scum rather than no scum using good materials... the point of this; using tap is fine if u feel like spending a ton of money on getting new plates when these wear away very fast

2. using baking soda is not a good idea... boyntonstu had a spectacular post about this in general discussions... its called something along the lines of "DO NOT use baking soda" look it up and read it... it explains that KOH and NaOH are the best electrolytes to use since they are true catalysts and do not wear away during ur electrolytic reaction... u use much less of it and get great results with a cleanly operating cell... point of this one; baking soda = bad; KOH or NaOH = good... keep using baking soda if u wanna spend a bunch of money on plates and a new container (way too much heat buildup)

hopefully all this helps... tap and baking soda are bad ideas... use KOH or NaOH with distilled water... ull get better results, use less, and have a cleaner cell

sm0kin
08-21-2008, 02:54 AM
my wonderings were about the discoloration around the edges. there was nothing covering the edges but there is no discoloration on them. my question is why no coloration on the edges. just trying to learn as much as i can and why things happen.

this is a test cell. so the baking soda is not a permanent thing.

Painless
08-21-2008, 03:05 AM
Just a theory, but perhaps the lack of discoloration around the edges is due to the current not making it out that far?

sm0kin
08-21-2008, 03:11 AM
i honestly never even thought of that. Is that plausible tho?

Painless
08-21-2008, 03:18 AM
I don't see why not, electricity will always take the path of least resistance, there must be a point where the voltage will stop flowing towards the plates edges and jump across the electrolyte instead. The discoloration, if my theory is true, is being caused by the electric flow.

I do remember reading somewhere that stainless steel does change color after a while of conducting current.

redneckgearhead34
08-21-2008, 12:09 PM
ok so i built a cell and have been running it at 8volts 4.5 amps using tap water and baking soda. i know the discoloration is possibly due to the electrolyte. the thing is the center of the plates are black and all around the edges there is no discoloration. if i ever figure out how to post a pic i will. thoughts on this, the plates are thin and possibly maybe they are closer in the middle? or the edges?

I am having the same problem. My cell runs 12v but I have coils instead of plates and I also use baking soda just like smokin. I was thinking it was some sort of overheating.

Farmercal
08-21-2008, 04:46 PM
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What in the world does this have to do with this thread? Unless the ancient chinese used hydroxy to power there vehicles.

RoddyHHO
08-23-2008, 03:31 AM
I don't see why not, electricity will always take the path of least resistance, there must be a point where the voltage will stop flowing towards the plates edges and jump across the electrolyte instead. The discoloration, if my theory is true, is being caused by the electric flow.

I do remember reading somewhere that stainless steel does change color after a while of conducting current.


From what I understand, the disadvantage of having plates simply submerged in an electrolyte is that the edges of the plates electrolize less efficiently than the middle of the plates. I believe this is what they call leakage current. Essentially this portion of your plates are generating leakage current, which is not making HHO, but does make a lot of heat.

sp1r0
08-23-2008, 10:48 AM
From what I understand, the disadvantage of having plates simply submerged in an electrolyte is that the edges of the plates electrolize less efficiently than the middle of the plates. I believe this is what they call leakage current. Essentially this portion of your plates are generating leakage current, which is not making HHO, but does make a lot of heat.

I think you are correct, which would explain why some people seal the edges, except for a slot across the plates so the HHO gets out.