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Thread: First off... which electrolytes NOT TO USE!

  1. Default First off... which electrolytes NOT TO USE!

    I'll compile a list of which electrolytes NOT to try, because they are harmful to yourself and other people.

    1. SALT (Sodium Chloride)

    (msg me if you have a solution to add to this list)

  2. #2
    alba Guest

    Default

    I would like to know what is the consequences using salt..

  3. #3
    bagrman Guest

    Default salt

    one is that it will make up Chlorine gas,
    2 you are putting salt residue into your motor to burn? Don't know the long term effects that would have.

  4. Default Problem

    Using Salt as an electrolye is not only bad, but also ineffective.

    So far the best "safe" mix I have found is 8 parts epsom salts, to 3 parts baking soda, per 2-2.5L of water.

    it is the most conductive, thus draws the most amperes, thus works the best.

    Every spoon added increased the amps drawn on the plates. Up until reached the max.

  5. #5
    reason Guest

    Default reply to problem

    Thanks for the tip Mike.how are you measuring the parts?

  6. #6
    CaptainAwesome Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeP View Post
    Using Salt as an electrolyte is not only bad, but also ineffective.

    So far the best "safe" mix I have found is 8 parts epsom salts, to 3 parts baking soda, per 2-2.5L of water.

    it is the most conductive, thus draws the most amperes, thus works the best.

    Every spoon added increased the amps drawn on the plates. Up until reached the max.
    I'll have to pick up on my chemistry skills, it's been a while since I studied it, but wouldn't using baking soda produce CO2?

    Again, I'm not sure at this at all, I will really have to look it up but I'm gonna guess it goes something like this:

    2NaHCO3 + H2O + Energy(electricity?) = 2H2 + O2 + 2CO2 + 2NaH
    (or maybe = 2H2 + 2CO2 + 2NaOH?)

    ..and then in a second step the Sodium hydride (or like Na and H ions i guess) would produce some more H2, but I'm not sure what would happen to the Na in there

    If no one beats me in explaining this I think I'll find the old books and try to figure it out.


    Oh right, my point being, is it wise using an electrolyte that will make your car produce CO2 and if so, it's probably a good idea separating the H2 and O2 from the CO2 before it's combusted.

  7. #7
    ENURO12 Guest

    Default

    Caustic Soda is perhaps the most commonly available and most effective. Their is another xxx E500 i'll find the full chem name.

    Their are lots of side effects of Caustic Soda so follow the warning labels!

  8. #8
    roller24 Guest

    Default

    Im using Ocean Water, it works very well, but I get hot after about 20 miles.
    I have 12 SS outlet covers 6+ / 6- about 3/8 inch apart. Im using threaded rod as connectors and am experiencing excessive corrosion. the HHO production is rapid though. I went from 28 hwy to better than 30mph around town. I havent pinpointed the hwy mileage, but will post that later.

    Im considering mounting the unit on the front of the car for air cooling.

  9. #9
    hmfdesigns Guest

    Default

    when using baking soda you are only making about 66% hydrogen and almost 30% carbon dioxide and even a littel carbon monoxide...not sure the exact figures anymore.

    my tests have shown potassium hydroxide is by far the best and other than it stains clothes it does not really have an effect ...it does tingle a little if you touch it but thats a given with anything caustic

  10. #10
    ELECTR0N3RD Guest

    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeP View Post
    Using Salt as an electrolye is not only bad, but also ineffective.

    So far the best "safe" mix I have found is 8 parts epsom salts, to 3 parts baking soda, per 2-2.5L of water.

    it is the most conductive, thus draws the most amperes, thus works the best.

    Every spoon added increased the amps drawn on the plates. Up until reached the max.
    I'm not 100% clear on this sorry if i sound dumb but, why is epsom salt any different from regular salt?, what is it? i know women use it in a bath once in a while for there personal care, but how does it differ from regular sodium chloride? is it like sea salt?

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