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Thread: Max MMW before over-unity ?

  1. #1

    Default Max MMW before over-unity ?

    The cell im repecating got 8.34 MMW brute force test. Im curious how
    much better can it get. So i would like to no what is the max MMW
    before over-unity?

    I see where 2.4 watt hours per liter is the point, but i'm not sure if
    im converting this right. I came up with 6.94 MMW as the max. is this
    Right?

    Also is over-unity just counting Hydrogen production? If so Then for
    HHO is just for Hydrogen the HHO mmw should be 33% higher to displace
    the O2. Example if 6.94 MMW is correct then 6.94 MWW for Hydrogen =
    9.236 for HHO. Is ths correct?

  2. #2
    JojoJaro Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Roland Jacques View Post
    The cell im repecating got 8.34 MMW brute force test. Im curious how
    much better can it get. So i would like to no what is the max MMW
    before over-unity?

    I see where 2.4 watt hours per liter is the point, but i'm not sure if
    im converting this right. I came up with 6.94 MMW as the max. is this
    Right?

    Also is over-unity just counting Hydrogen production? If so Then for
    HHO is just for Hydrogen the HHO mmw should be 33% higher to displace
    the O2. Example if 6.94 MMW is correct then 6.94 MWW for Hydrogen =
    9.236 for HHO. Is ths correct?

    Well, according to the PDF, max is 6.182 mmw. This is for both H2 and O2 volume.

    However, this is just straight chemical based eletrolysis. This does not take into account gains that might be possible using resonance, emf or magnetic force, although none of these have actually be proven to aid in electrolysis. These are just speculations.

  3. #3
    dennis13030 Guest

    Default What PDF???

    The larger the milliliters per minute per watt(mmw) value is the more efficient the electrolyzer is. This "Unity" or "Over Unity" thing you are talking about is also the efficiency but stated as "Gain" or a percentage of Power Out vs Power In.

    Gain values have no units. The input power and output power are normally stated as with the same units and therefore cancel out in the "Gain" equation.

    In physics, it is understood that, with all systems, you can not get more power(aka energy) out than the power(aka energy) the you put in.

    I.e. A transformer converts V1 to V2 at the cost of current. The gain of most transformers are slightly less than one(1).

    I.e. We light a match and put it into some gasoline. We get a lot of heat energy from the burning of the match and the gas. Some may say that the energy input was only the match. In a small view of the world, this is true. However, in the larger picture, the match and the gasoline are the inputs.

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