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Thread: Is 18 gauge better than 20 gauge stainless?

  1. Default Is 18 gauge better than 20 gauge stainless?

    Hello,

    I'm new and still experimenting and working towards building a dry cell generator.

    I'm "messing" around with wet cell generation right now because it's a lot easier to start out with.

    I was wondering if anyone could tell me if there is any disadvantage to using 20 gauge Stainless as opposed to 18 gauge?

    I've noticed that most designs use 18 gauge.
    Does 20 gauge produce less hho?
    Will the electrodes degrade with use? Maybe this is why everyone uses 18 gauge?

    I plan to have a 13.8v system (eventually) with 7 or more plates.

    Sorry for so many questions.

    Thanks in advance for any reply.

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    I Have a large dry cell made from 20 gauge Stainless Steel it runs great. The dry cell is made +nnnnn- 97 plates all togetter. I played around with the wet cell build just about everyone out there. I have to say the dry cell is the best. The water is clean and you don't lose all current around the plates and build up heat.

  3. Default

    Thank you for the reply Mrbluemoose.

    I appreciate the advice.

    Glad to hear that it can be done. I hope to build my wet cell and keep my plates intact for the dry cell in the future.

    Am I understanding that you have 97 plates in your cell?

    I may be shooting way too low.

    Regards,
    Tim

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    My 97 Plate dry cell is a over kill you don't need a cell that big . I just Play with things for fun . I have some photos here.
    Attached Images

  5. #5

    Default

    Tim,
    20ga. is fine to use if that's what you can get. 18 ga. may last a bit longer and has less resistance though.
    Ideally, you should use 18 for the powered plates and 20 for the bipolars.
    1998 Explorer 4x4, 4.0
    14 cell / 2 stack 6x9" drycell reactor 28%KOH dual EFIE, MAF enhancer, IAT & ECT controllers, 2.4 LPM @ 30 amps. 6.35 MMW http://reduceyourfuelbill.com.au/forum/index.php

  6. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lhazleton View Post
    Tim,
    20ga. is fine to use if that's what you can get. 18 ga. may last a bit longer and has less resistance though.
    Ideally, you should use 18 for the powered plates and 20 for the bipolars.
    im looking at a ga chart, and i see that the ssl 20 ga is 0.0359 in thick...is that accurate? i mean that is about 9mm thick which is about 25/64" that cant be right...what is the thickness in mm that i should look for the 20 ga?

  7. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kutuluh View Post
    im looking at a ga chart, and i see that the ssl 20 ga is 0.0359 in thick...is that accurate? i mean that is about 9mm thick which is about 25/64" that cant be right...what is the thickness in mm that i should look for the 20 ga?
    Your decimal point is in the wrong place. 20 gauge is about 0.9mm thick.

  8. Default

    that must be it... thanks D.O.G!!!

  9. #9

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by mrbluemoose View Post
    My 97 Plate dry cell is a over kill you don't need a cell that big . I just Play with things for fun . I have some photos here.
    That is a very clean setup

  10. Default

    I jusT got a 2012 Silverado 6.6 Diesel I'm getting two Dry 9x9 Dry cells made . I hope I can get about 4 lpm from each. I will post the setup later thanks

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