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Thread: How about Nickel Iron Batteries

  1. #1
    JojoJaro Guest

    Default How about Nickel Iron Batteries

    Folks, Noob here. Only started researching HHO injection 4 days ago. Been reading most of the post and responses here.

    While researching batteries for my solar project, I came across Nickel Iron batteries.

    http://www.beutilityfree.com/nife.html

    Then an Idea hit me. Why can't we take this NiFe battery, empty the electrolyte, clean the insides up, put our own electrolyte, fabricate some ports for collecting the HHO and voila, we should have an HHO generator already built for us, including the clear case which is helpful in seeing the gas production.

    The anode is iron. The cathode is nickel-oxide-hydroxide. Does this have the correct electode type and chemistry.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nickel-iron_battery

    Note that one of the bad things about this battery when used as a battery is excessive gassing (hydrogen gas) when being charged. Looks like it is already an electrolyzer in disguise.

    What do you guys think?

  2. #2
    HomeGrown Guest

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    Would probably work great.... briefly. Haven't you noticed that about 98% of the HHO cells that people build use stainless steel electrodes? The case would be beautiful, IF it could withstand the high temps of the cell (typically way more than a battery will ever see).

    Welcome to the forum, stick around and see what we're doing!

  3. #3
    c02cutter Guest

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    You will wind up with a pile of sludge in the bottom of the battery from the iron plates in the battery. I did some experiments using just steel plates which contain a pile of iron. It was a disaster in just a few minutes with the iron floating in the electrolyte. I also did tests of just using my tap water which I know is high in iron... same results, only a bit less than using the plates as the iron content. The other thing is if you have plates that are iron, they will eat up from the process. I also used Ti-6Al-4V titanium, but there is too much aluminum involved to be cost effective or productive. It turned to swiss cheese in less than an hour.

  4. #4
    JojoJaro Guest

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    Is the Iron eaten up due to the electrolyte?

    Maybe if we use a different electrolyte, the iron will last?

  5. #5
    c02cutter Guest

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    'm going to do a video in the next couple days to demonstrate what happens using a steel plate configuration. It will be just an anode and cathode but you will see the results. I'll use material that is .03 thick that I know I have on hand, but also use the same configuration using .015 316SS that my first cell to play with was built on, This way you can see the results.

  6. #6
    JojoJaro Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by c02cutter View Post
    'm going to do a video in the next couple days to demonstrate what happens using a steel plate configuration. It will be just an anode and cathode but you will see the results. I'll use material that is .03 thick that I know I have on hand, but also use the same configuration using .015 316SS that my first cell to play with was built on, This way you can see the results.
    No, no, no ... I am not questioning you or your results.

    I am asking if the Iron degradation could be a function of the type of electrolyte being used. If somehow changing electrolytes may help.

  7. #7
    1973dodger Guest

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    Gentlemen, read my post concerning the thread "copper and gas". I think you will find it interesting to know that only the positive, which attracts oxygen, is the culprit in dissolving soft metals. Which means the electrolye is not the culprit. It is the oxygen. I think the nickle plates would hold up fine as the positive, since the better the quality of SS, such as 316l, will have a higher nickle content.

    1973 dodger

  8. #8
    JojoJaro Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1973dodger View Post
    Gentlemen, read my post concerning the thread "copper and gas". I think you will find it interesting to know that only the positive, which attracts oxygen, is the culprit in dissolving soft metals. Which means the electrolye is not the culprit. It is the oxygen. I think the nickle plates would hold up fine as the positive, since the better the quality of SS, such as 316l, will have a higher nickle content.

    1973 dodger
    Cathod is Nickel-oxide-hydroxide. Are you saying this battery might actually work as an electrolyzer without the Iron Anode degrading too much?

    Just trying to understand it better.

  9. #9
    HomeGrown Guest

    Thumbs up

    Very good info, dodger.

  10. #10
    1973dodger Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JojoJaro View Post
    Cathod is Nickel-oxide-hydroxide. Are you saying this battery might actually work as an electrolyzer without the Iron Anode degrading too much?

    Just trying to understand it better.
    The material you use for the negative will still need to be a material which can hold up under wet conditions, such as copper, brass, aluminum. Then the material you have to use as the positive will have to be SS, titanium, nickle, platnuim.

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