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Thread: Plate Size and Container Volume

  1. #1
    Aspico Guest

    Default Plate Size and Container Volume

    What is the optimum plate size in relation to container size. Is there a formula to determine? I've seen cells with plate sizes ranging from 2.5x4 all the way to 5x8 - all in a multitude of different sized containers? All claiming the same or close to the same HHO production volume? What would you guys say would be a good ratio plate to water?

    I've also seen the same with hoses? Some use quarter inch tubing others 3/8? with the same sized cells? What do you think?

  2. #2
    dennis13030 Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aspico View Post
    What is the optimum plate size in relation to container size. Is there a formula to determine? I've seen cells with plate sizes ranging from 2.5x4 all the way to 5x8 - all in a multitude of different sized containers? All claiming the same or close to the same HHO production volume? What would you guys say would be a good ratio plate to water?

    I've also seen the same with hoses? Some use quarter inch tubing others 3/8? with the same sized cells? What do you think?
    I would have to say that matching the container size with the plates is best. That is to say that in the X and Z directions, there should be very little gap between the walls of the container and the plate stack. In the Y direction, the plate stack should be at the bottom of the container with very little gap between the bottom of the container and the plate stack. Also in the Y direction, there should be a large gap between the top of the container and the plate stack.

    The container needs to be robust for the application. It has to handle high temperatures, drilling, weight and it needs to provide an air tight seal.

  3. #3
    timetowinarace Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aspico View Post
    What is the optimum plate size in relation to container size. Is there a formula to determine? I've seen cells with plate sizes ranging from 2.5x4 all the way to 5x8 - all in a multitude of different sized containers? All claiming the same or close to the same HHO production volume? What would you guys say would be a good ratio plate to water?

    I've also seen the same with hoses? Some use quarter inch tubing others 3/8? with the same sized cells? What do you think?
    There is no optimum plate size to container size ratio.

    There is a minimum recomended plate size to amps though. If I remember correctly there should be 2 square inches of active plate surface area for every amp of current.

    The reason I say there is no plate size/container size ratio is because the the cantainer is just a container. It has no active role in electrolysis other than holding components, electrolyte and gas. The basic idea for hho for automotive use requires that we get the largest amount of plate area in the smallest amount of space. That is the main reason for all of the different booster designs. The other reason is material availability.

    The amount of water solution depends on two factors. One, mentioned above, is size limitations. The other is heat. If your cell is ineffecient, using less water will overheat it faster. More water means it will heat more slowly but still probably over heat eventually.

    Tubing size doesn't matter much unless you need go very far with it. My grandmothers oxegen machine puts out over 5LPM through a very small tube. Smaller than a 1/4". I usually use 3/8 because hose and fittings are easier to work with.

  4. #4
    Aspico Guest

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    Thanks for the info, appreciate it.

  5. #5
    Smith03Jetta Guest

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    The method that I've adopted is this:

    Assume that you are building a device for a specific car. Inspect the car thoroughly. Take the Grille/Bumper off if you have to. Locate and measure any unused space. Space in the fender wells and in front of the radiator is preferable to engine compartment because of ambient temperature concerns. Never put one close to the engine or exhaust.

    With the measurements of the possible locations in hand make a cardboard mock-up of the container size you plan to put in the space you measured. See if it will fit. Sometimes wires, bolts, hoses and things fool you. You may think you can fit a 10 x 6 x 7 container in the space but really can only fit a 8 x 5 x 6 container in the space considering obstructions.

    Once you know your size limits start looking for a suitable container that will fit in that opening. Keep in mind gas fittings for the top take a couple inches of clearance as well.

    Once you have your container in hand build your plates to fit the container.

    What good is a really good plate design and a really good container if it won't fit in your car?

  6. #6

    Default

    Plate size should certainly be considered as the first thought...The next thought for a container is how much electrolyte you want to hold...Remember, as temp goes up-but only to a limit- after that production goes back down...By having an ample ammount of electrolyte in your generator, the cooler it will be. For the material selection, SS Box or polycarbonate seem to be the best. Then again you could simply build a series of generators to fit the vehicle, too...
    "You don't always have to know ALL the answers, but you do need to know where to find them."

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