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Thread: KOH mix strength, amps versus production

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    OK, Are you referring to overall 28% KOH per gallon, or per liter? That's an awfully high concentration.
    Wouldn't that high of a percentage eat the plates for lunch, and spontaneously melt all of your wires running the cell? LOL

    The highest I have heard anyone running their cells was about 5 or 6 tea spoons per gallon.

  2. #12
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    Default Please use the search funtion.

    Quote Originally Posted by ydeardorff View Post
    OK, Are you referring to overall 28% KOH per gallon, or per liter? That's an awfully high concentration.
    Wouldn't that high of a percentage eat the plates for lunch, and spontaneously melt all of your wires running the cell? LOL

    The highest I have heard anyone running their cells was about 5 or 6 tea spoons per gallon.
    There are numerous posts of people using the 28% KOH (mass percentage) for lower resistance and for better anti-freeze protection.

    The reason others use only a few percent KOH is because they are controlling the amperes this way. High resistance low percentage electrolyte reduces the current but is low efficiency.

    At this point, I will bow out of this conversation as you have your pre-concieved ideas. Good luck making 30 watts of heat from your 100 watt input.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by ydeardorff View Post
    OK, Are you referring to overall 28% KOH per gallon, or per liter? That's an awfully high concentration.
    Wouldn't that high of a percentage eat the plates for lunch, and spontaneously melt all of your wires running the cell? LOL

    The highest I have heard anyone running their cells was about 5 or 6 tea spoons per gallon.

    28% is 28%, regardless of the quantity. 1 gallon, 1 liter, or 1 million gallons.

    That concentration would be for plates that are widely spaced, the closer the plates, the lower the electrolyte concentration will be. Unless your intending on heating up most of your electronics!
    Its done right or its not done !
    Hail HHO.

  4. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Madsceintist View Post
    28% is 28%, regardless of the quantity. 1 gallon, 1 liter, or 1 million gallons.

    That concentration would be for plates that are widely spaced, the closer the plates, the lower the electrolyte concentration will be. Unless your intending on heating up most of your electronics!
    Nope dont want to do that.

    I guess its a trial and error method. Finding the right output, and stable heat. After the cell rebuild Ill be running 1/8" spacers before compression. The total volume of electrolyte is 1 gallon, so It should help me figure out whats needed to run the system.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by ydeardorff View Post
    Nope dont want to do that.

    I guess its a trial and error method. Finding the right output, and stable heat. After the cell rebuild Ill be running 1/8" spacers before compression. The total volume of electrolyte is 1 gallon, so It should help me figure out whats needed to run the system.

    I would suggest myoldyourgold for some help here, but depending on your target output will depend on the specs you want to build on.
    Its done right or its not done !
    Hail HHO.

  6. Default

    thats what I was planning. 28% is far higher a mix strength than Id like to go with for an indoor appliance. @28% seems like Id need a pwm with a heat sink on it the size of a small volkswagen.
    My latest cell got a MMW of 6 @ 50 degrees electrolyte temp. So that's a good starting point @ 3 teaspoons per gallon. The search function works fine.
    I was looking for a mix ratio to plate gap, and cell size, to go along with a pwm duty cycle and frequency.
    Never mind I guess Ill just figure this stuff out myself. Sry for bothering the "mentors" LOL

  7. #17
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    Default Excuse me for butting in again.

    Quote Originally Posted by ydeardorff View Post
    thats what I was planning. 28% is far higher a mix strength than Id like to go with for an indoor appliance. @28% seems like Id need a pwm with a heat sink on it the size of a small volkswagen.
    My latest cell got a MMW of 6 @ 50 degrees electrolyte temp. So that's a good starting point @ 3 teaspoons per gallon. The search function works fine.
    I was looking for a mix ratio to plate gap, and cell size, to go along with a pwm duty cycle and frequency.
    Never mind I guess Ill just figure this stuff out myself. Sry for bothering the "mentors" LOL
    It was my fault for getting off on the tangent of system viability and efficiency.

    If you want absolute electrolysis efficiency, you must reduce the voltage across each cell. Current is needed to produce HHO, but the lower your voltage across each cell, the higher your MMW.

    The more concentrated your electrolyte ( up to saturation) the lower your voltage needs to be to drive a particular current. Some electrolytes are more effective than others but it is hard to beat KOH as a common material.

    The closer your cell spacing the lower your drive voltage.

    The higher your electrolyte temperature the lower your drive voltage.

    "Better" electrode plate materials can reduce your drive voltage.

    I use true Faraday type cells instead of the through hole "dry cells" or the wet bath arrangements. This means I can optimize a single cell for the current capacity of my power supply. Notice current is largely unaffected by plate area. Just make sure plate area is large enough to keep you in the 0.5amps/cm*cm or less, to keep plating and erosion minimal.

    I use 304 tubular stainless electrodes spaced 3mm (1/8") apart. For example: Saturated NaOH electrolyte yields a current/temperature/voltage curve of 5A/25degC/2.6V, 10A/40degC/2.3V and 15A/80degC/2.0V.

    These may not conform to other's test numbers, but it allows me to design based on my cell configuration by simply stacking the number of cells to meet my power supply capabilities and the temperature I expect to operate at. This allows you to maximize your MMW.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by koya1893 View Post
    Each Mentor should get a Paypal account so when question like this pop up, those asking the question will pay, maybe then the answer will be appreciated. Thing are not appreciated when given freely.
    Excellent idea, sir!

  9. #19
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    Default The value of the answers isn't guaranteed by mentor status.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stevo View Post
    Excellent idea, sir!
    The list of Mentors shows a great variability in the ability to answer questions with lucidity.

  10. #20

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    Higher than all mighty............................Speaks. However true or not, to ANY extent !


    Can't let a dead horse be ??

    Must be feeling lonely ............
    Its done right or its not done !
    Hail HHO.

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