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Thread: HHO to improve fuel economy? BS.....

  1. Default HHO to improve fuel economy? BS.....

    At least not if you are using an alternator driven by the engine to produce the electricity to generate your hho. First let me say that I got my degree in AMT, and I ran my own auto repair business for many years, so I know what I am talking about. This would violate Newtons first law, it will take more power to drive the generator that makes the electricity to produce the hydrogen than it will give back to the engine, period.
    I'm, not saying that this is entirely impossible, hho can be used to improve efficiency IF, and only if, you find another way to get the electricity, from something that is otherwise wasted, like HEAT. Gasoline, after all, is only about 10% efficient. For every 10 btu's created, 1 drives the engine, and 9 go out the radiator. Consider this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automo...tric_generator
    A thermoelectric generator is the the way to do it, and the only way, imo.

    If you really want better fuel economy, use premium gas (always, they sell cheap gas because people seem to be willing to spend more at the pump, to get a lower price!) and add a few NAPTHELENE mothballs. READ THE LABEL, they also sell "para" mothballs, since it's cheaper, but paradichlorobenzine is not mothballs, it's URINAL CAKE, and you don't want to put that stuff in your gas. If you read the labels on the bottles of "fuel stabilizer", or "octane booster" at the parts store, all they are is naptha, at a markup that defeats using it to save on gas. NAPTHELENE is the solid polymer, and it disolves back into naptha in your gas tank. I know there are naysayers to that, too, but this works, I have done it, and usually see a 50% increase in fuel economy over regular pump gas.
    Last edited by Stoichiometric Ratio; 05-24-2014 at 12:02 AM.

  2. #2
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    Default I call BS on your depth of understanding of the subject.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stoichiometric Ratio View Post
    At least not if you are using an alternator driven by the engine to produce the electricity to generate your hho. First let me say that I got my degree in AMT, and I ran my own auto repair business for many years, so I know what I am talking about. This would violate Newtons first law, it will take more power to drive the generator that makes the electricity to produce the hydrogen than it will give back to the engine, period.
    I'm, not saying that this is entirely impossible, hho can be used to improve efficiency IF, and only if, you find another way to get the electricity, from something that is otherwise wasted, like HEAT. Gasoline, after all, is only about 10% efficient. For every 10 btu's created, 1 drives the engine, and 9 go out the radiator. Consider this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automo...tric_generator
    A thermoelectric generator is the the way to do it, and the only way, imo.

    If you really want better fuel economy, use premium gas (always, they sell cheap gas because people seem to be willing to spend more at the pump, to get a lower price!) and add a few NAPTHELENE mothballs. READ THE LABEL, they also sell "para" mothballs, since it's cheaper, but paradichlorobenzine is not mothballs, it's URINAL CAKE, and you don't want to put that stuff in your gas. If you read the labels on the bottles of "fuel stabilizer", or "octane booster" at the parts store, all they are is naptha, at a markup that defeats using it to save on gas. NAPTHELENE is the solid polymer, and it disolves back into naptha in your gas tank. I know there are naysayers to that, too, but this works, I have done it, and usually see a 50% increase in fuel economy over regular pump gas.
    Your post even gives hints to how HHO could benefit an engine. You say the gasoline engine is inefficient and it is wasting most of it's thermal energy. And yet, you cannot see the possibility that HHO in small amounts can change the "combustion profile" resulting in less wasted energy. Look up "ozone seeding" or hydrogen seeding. The HHO generator produces a small amount of both ozone and H+ radicals which affect the combustion process significantly. Government research papers show ozone concentrations as small as 40 parts per million (ppm) can accelerate a combustion process. The presence of H+ radicals is a classic theory of combustion. If you don't understand the thermochemistry involved, it might be better of you to not make a blanket statement as you have done.

    And your inclusion of mothballs undermines your credibility. Your claims of 50% fuel efficiency gains would put your gasoline engine on par with a good diesel in terms of thermal efficiency. More information on these experiments would be forthcoming.

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