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Thread: Ideas I've known

  1. #1

    Default Ideas I've known

    An Ausie invented a pulsed EM device that broke hydrocarbon chains down into lighter compounds which converted bad gas into good useable gas, and made good gas great gas, much better gas mileage. This device is now used to turn heavy crude into sweet light crude. It was just a coil of copper wire wound around a fuel hose, driven by a free running oscillator.

    I believe this same Ausie invented a vortex fuel atomizer which atomized fuel much better than anything currently being used.

    Ionized intake air:
    http://www.freepatentsonline.com/6675780.pdf

    Lots of possibilities here:
    http://www.freepatentsonline.com/res...it=&patents=on

  2. #2

    Default

    Vortex atomizer for water:
    http://www.vortexair.biz/Cooling/Spr...rayvector.html

    Leaves me wondering what all might have to be done to use this for atomizing fuel.

  3. #3
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Retro View Post
    Vortex atomizer for water:
    http://www.vortexair.biz/Cooling/Spr...rayvector.html

    Leaves me wondering what all might have to be done to use this for atomizing fuel.
    It is already done in current power generation systems and in early diesels.

  4. #4

    Default

    I don't believe I've seen any OEM method of atomizing fuel which makes droplets as small as a vortex nozzle can. A vortex nozzle does almost as well as an ultrasonic atomizer.

  5. #5
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    Default Look up . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Retro View Post
    I don't believe I've seen any OEM method of atomizing fuel which makes droplets as small as a vortex nozzle can. A vortex nozzle does almost as well as an ultrasonic atomizer.
    . . . Transonic Combustion in Camarillo California. They have a critical point injection system that, for all intents and purposes, results in sub-micron fuel droplets. The effectiveness is seen in the fact that diesel applications produce particulates only in the sub-micron range. A range far below most of the particulate traps.

    Also, air assisted injection is used in fuel burners and diesels all over the world. This is not a new technology.

  6. #6

    Default

    I knew there were benefits to heating fuel, but can't say I ever heard that it would help atomize diesel or any fuel of that nature, although better atomization would be a side benefit of reducing the surface tension of any liquid. To hit sub-micron level though, my 1st impression is something more than heat is involved.

    Got to say I have not seen air involved with any injectors on the market. But, it's been a few years since I was directly involved with anything that might make use of direct injection. Seems to me it would be a selling point and so marketing would be sure it was in the public eye. Who uses air with injectors, and what methods do they use?

  7. #7
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    Default Injection technology is keeping up with the needs of the market.

    Quote Originally Posted by Retro View Post
    I knew there were benefits to heating fuel, but can't say I ever heard that it would help atomize diesel or any fuel of that nature, although better atomization would be a side benefit of reducing the surface tension of any liquid. To hit sub-micron level though, my 1st impression is something more than heat is involved.

    Got to say I have not seen air involved with any injectors on the market. But, it's been a few years since I was directly involved with anything that might make use of direct injection. Seems to me it would be a selling point and so marketing would be sure it was in the public eye. Who uses air with injectors, and what methods do they use?
    The heating of the fuel in Transonic's application is not just for the sake of viscosity reduction. Heat and pressure bring it to a critical point where the three phases of matter meet (gas, liquid and solid). Upon injection into the working chamber, the rate of fuel diffusion is greatly accelerated resulting in much improved fuel mixing before the oxidation (combustion) commences. Critical point studies are a regular part of undergraduate chemistry and physics majors and become quite involved. Without foreknowledge of the science, it can become a meaningless discussion but, suffice it to say, the fuel combustion characteristics are greatly accelerated and compressed resulting in possible fuel savings and emissions reductions - characteristics which can be paralleled by HHO addition.

    Air assisted injection goes all the way back to the earliest diesels. They also were used in modern gasoline production vehicles. Subaru, Honda and a few Italian makes are users that come to mind. A leader in heavy fuel air assisted injection is Orbital of Australia. You can see some of their applications in this article:

    http://www.eaa.ca/experimenter/artic...09-12_fuel.asp

  8. #8

    Default

    Now that's impressive.

    They have the technology that far along, and it's not in general use with automobiles.

    Thanks for providing your knowledge and the link Rusty.

    Heavy workload this week and next, so my visits to the forum will be few for a while.

    -Retro

  9. #9

    Default

    Breaking down hydrocarbons using pulsed EM:
    http://www.vlbengine.com/cracker.html

  10. #10

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